Fixing Facebook

fbpurityFacebook. You’re stuck with its interface, right? If the gods in Menlo Park decide you’re getting Suggested
Posts, just have to grin and bear it.

Actually, you don’t.

F.B. Purity is an anti-spam browser extension that alters your view of Facebook to show only the stuff you
want. It removes annoying fluff like ads, sponsored stories and all manner of game and application spam.

But wait, there’s more! Actually, a lot more. It has too many features to list here, but my favourites include:

  • Disable autoplay videos
  • Full-screen chat messages
  • Remove Trending Topics
  • Show deleted friend alerts
  • Hide Suggested Posts
  • Filter your newsfeed
  • Change Facebook’s fonts and colours

FBP works on the Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Opera browsers, and installation’s a doddle. Just follow the instructions here.

Once installed, it adds a discreet “FBP” to your toolbar line. Just click it and choose the options you prefer from the pop-up window.
fbpCheck out their Facebook page.

 

 

Share this ...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page

I’ve got your password!

Compiled from files containing millions of stolen passwords, SplashData have released a list of the world’s worst passwords. Here they are …

SplashData’s “Worst Passwords of 2013”

Rank
Password
Change from 2012
1
123456
Up 1
2
password
Down 1
3
12345678
Unchanged
4
qwerty
Up 1
5
abc123
Down 1
6
123456789
New
7
111111
Up 2
8
1234567
Up 5
9
iloveyou
Up 2
10
adobe123
New
11
123123
Up 5
12
sunshine
Up 2
13
1234567890
New
14
letmein
Down 7
15
photoshop
New
16
1234
New
17
monkey
Down 11
18
shadow
Unchanged
19
sunshine
Down 5
20
12345
New
21
password1
Up 4
22
princess
New
23
azerty
New
24
trustno1
Down 12
25
000000
New

 

For the first time in years, “password” has dropped from its number 1 slot. And a couple of newcomers — “adobe123” and “photoshop” — no doubt reflect the heist of 2.9 million Adobe passwords last October.

Unfortunately, there’s one key element missing from the data: the actual frequency the passwords are used. “123456” might be top of the heap, but if only 0.01% of ten million users use it, it’s not terribly significant. However, if it featured in 5% of all captured passwords, then it’s a cause for concern.

And then there’s institutions that seem to actively discourage using decent passwords. Banks, for example. Many restrict internet passwords to 8 characters — so you can’t use vastly more secure pass-phrases like “most_bankers_are_bastards” — and you must use only alphabetic characters and numbers. No underscores, ampersands, exclamation marks or the like are permitted. But the hell, it’s only money. If someone does crack your account, no doubt their security policy will say it’s your fault.

 

bank_pw

Still, if you’re using dumb passwords like “1234” and “000000”, you really are asking for trouble!

 

Share this ...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page

A stylish breeze

Typhoon is a stylish, open source weather app for Linux and Windows.

typhoon

It’s a derivative of Stormcloud, which was one of Ubuntu’s Top 10 Paid Apps for a month or two last year. The big difference is that Typhoon’s free.

Linux installation’s simple. On the command line …

add the repository …

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:apandada1/typhoon

update the repository index …

sudo apt-get update

and install Typhoon …

sudo apt-get install typhoon

 

Windows users can download the Typhoon from here.

To configure it, click the gear icon at the top and enter your location.

typhoon-cfg

Once the icon at the side turns to a tick, click it and you’re done. If it can’t find your location, check out Typhoon’s Help page for more details.

 

Share this ...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page

Killing CapsLock

The CapsLock key is pretty useless unless you want to SHOUT ALL THE TIME. If you find yourself accidentally bumping it on, here’s how to disable it.

The xmodmap utility allows you to modify keyboard mappings. To list your current mappings, enter this command:

xmodmap -pke

 

To modify a key mapping, make a local copy of xmodmap like this:

xmodmap -pke > ~/.my-xmodmap

 

Then edit it a text editor. For example if you use nano

nano ~/.my-xmodmap

 

To kill CapsLock, scroll down and change keycode 66 from this;

keycode 66 = Caps_Lock NoSymbol Caps_Lock

to this;

keycode 66 =

and save the file.

 
Now tell xmodmap to use your file as the default …

xmodmap ~/.my-xmodmap

… and you’ll now find that CapsLock does nothing!

 
To invoke that command every time you boot, just add it to the bottom of your ~/.bashrc file. Or run this command to add it automatically:

echo 'xmodmap ~/.my-xmodmap' >> ~/.bashrc

 
 
 

Share this ...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInDigg thisShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page